A think tank for fairer pay, worker voice and better business

This website houses research publications, blogs, information about our latest events, and related media articles. Subscribe for occasional updates on our work.

PAY COUNTER

Since 1 January 2021 the average FTSE 100 CEO has earned:

£3,366,308

How does your pay compare?

A think tank for fairer pay, worker voice and better business

This website houses research publications, blogs, information about our latest events, and related media articles. Subscribe for occasional updates on our work.

PAY COUNTER

Since 1 January 2021 the average FTSE 100 CEO has earned:

£3,366,308

How does your pay compare?

This year we’re celebrating our 10 year anniversary. Click here for more information about events we’re running on this theme, as well as some blog pieces reflecting on what’s changed in this period.

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Our campaigns

Worker representation

Worker representation on boards and remuneration committees should be mandatory for all major companies. Worker representation can help to ensure that the interests and views of workers are taken into account on issues including pay and conditions. It can improve decision making by increasing diversity of thought and experience. In countries such as Germany where these policies already exist, there is lower inequality and evidence of companies having a better record of acting in the public interest.

Purpose beyond profit

There is an urgent need for us to move from a stakeholder to a shareholder model of capitalism. From Davos to the Business Roundtable, some of the world’s most powerful businesspeople are also calling for this. This now needs to move from action to words. In the UK we advocate reforming the Companies Act to change the responsibilities of directors from being legally required to prioritise shareholders to one where the interests of workers, consumers, wider society and the environment are given equal priority.

Trade Union Rights

There is strong evidence of a correlation between the strength of trade unions in a country and lower inequality. In the UK the gap between the lowest and highest paid at listed companies began to grow rapidly in the 1980’s with the introduction of anti-union legislation and the decline of trade union membership which has followed. This trend only began to slow down following the 2008 global economic crisis. While trade union membership in the UK has increased in the past three years, levels remain low compared to comparable European countries. We believe that expanding trade union and collective bargaining coverage is crucial to tackling the twin scourge of low pay and excessive executive pay.

Twitter

This is a positive intervention from @jon_trickett and one parliamentarians of all parties should support if they believe in a fairer tax system.

As @KGriffithsTimes notes, FTSE 100 CEO pay increased from £2.27 million in 2009 to £3.63 million in 2018.

In the mean time real wages for workers have been largely stagnant.

The case for tougher action against excessive executive pay remains strong.https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-critics-of-excessive-executive-pay-must-carry-on-the-struggle-sgsgbz907

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